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2022 Player/Parent Handbook

SHERBROOKE SUNS CONTACT DETAILS

PRESIDENT
Mick Spruhan, 0407 838 773
suns@sherbrookebasketball.asn.au

SECRETARY
Pamela Ball, 0401 996 046
secretary@sherbrookebasketball.asn.au

JUNIOR REPRESENTATIVE ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER
junior.rep@sherbrookebasketball.asn.au

TEAM MANAGER CO-ORDINATOR

VJBL DELEGATE
junior.rep@sherbrookebasketball.asn.au

COACHING DIRECTOR
Chad Burton
coachdirector@sherbrookebasketball.asn.au

FEE CO-ORDINATOR
Judy Seamer
treasurer@sherbrookebasketball.asn.au

UNIFORMS AND MERCHANDISE
Angela Cohen
uniforms@sherbrookebasketball.asn.au

Welcome to the Sherbrooke SUNS Junior Representative Basketball Program.

Sherbrooke SUNS Basketball allows maximum involvement in each age group, from the under 12’s right through to the Big V Youth League and Senior Divisions. The skills and experience that the players develop in playing for Junior Representative Teams carries them through into the senior program. The links between the junior and senior programs are integral to players understanding their opportunities for progression.

As the Representative Basketball season runs across a ten-month period, a large degree of commitment is required from players, coaches and parents to achieve a successful season. This includes attending ALL training sessions and games.

Sherbrooke SUNS was born out of the need for those playing Sherbrooke Domestic Competition to go to the next level and compete more broadly by representing their own association and playing representative basketball. The Sherbrooke Board of Management feel that it is not enough to simply commit to playing Junior Representative without actively contributing to the domestic association, which gives players the representative program opportunity. While participation in the domestic competition is not compulsory at Sherbrooke, it is something we actively encourage.

From Sherbrooke to You

  • Opportunity to play representative basketball at your optimum level
  • Quality training and coaching at age appropriate levels
  • A warm and inviting environment in which to learn and succeed
  • A pathway through to senior representative opportunities
  • The promotion of the benefit of team sport in preparing young people with life skills
  • Opportunity to develop relationships in the wider basketball community

From You to Sherbrooke

  • Try your utmost to reach your full potential
  • Show respect to all parties, at all levels
  • Fully commit to the betterment of the team as a whole
  • Fulfil obligations to assist at Big V games
  • Fulfil obligations to participate in domestic competition
  • Contribute to the continued development of growth at Sherbrooke Basketball

Sherbrooke SUNS takes the issue of cyber bullying very seriously. Parents should be aware of this and discuss it with their child so there is a clear understanding of expectations. NO SHERBROOKE SUNS TEAM IS PERMITTED TO SET UP A TEAM SOCIAL MEDIA SITE. The Club has an official monitored Facebook page.

Unlike domestic basketball, which is played in two seasons, Representative Basketball is played throughout most of the year in three phases. 

  • Grading Phase 1               December
  • Grading Phase 2               February to March
  • Championship Phase      April to August
  • Finals                                  September

A copy of the year’s calendar is available on www.vjbl.com.au

The Junior Representative Working Group takes direction from, and reports to, the Sherbrooke Board of Management, and is responsible for implementing necessary procedures to facilitate the operation of the program.  Duties such as distributing uniforms, recording player details at tryouts, ensuring players are registered, ensuring official paperwork for Coaches and Team Managers is in order, and that all teams have the required equipment and information.  The Working Group are all volunteers that are working to provide a great basketball experience for players and their families. Functions performed by the Working Group include:

  • Fees Co-Ordinator
  • Team Manager Co-Ordinator
  • VJBL Representative
  • Uniform/Merchandise Co-Ordinator

Training sessions are held twice a week throughout the season. Training will be on a Sunday for two (2) hours and midweek for one (1) hour. Training is at Upwey High School stadium.  Players need to arrive at training at least 15 minutes before the start time or as otherwise directed by the Coach. If there is a group training on your court when you arrive, do not take to the court until your appointed time.

Sherbrooke understands that some family events or illness can cause missed training sessions, but there are no other valid excuses. For example, sleepovers, parties, etc., are not acceptable reasons for missing training.  If you are injured, you are still expected to attend training sessions and games. Please inform your Coach or Team Manager as early as possible, with a valid reason, if you cannot attend a training or game.

Games are played on a home and away basis on a Friday night. Games normally start from 6.40pm through to 9.40pm. Venues will vary depending on grading. Our home courts are Upwey High School.

There is no door entry charge at any venues for the 2022 season.  The team game day fee covers players and spectators and is a lump sum of $125.00 for 60 minute time slots or $135.00 for 80 minute time slots.   This money is collected by the Team Manager and at this stage is paid on arrival at the venue.   

 Contact Details

Please ensure you provide correct contact details to the club. If you change your details (telephone number, email etc) during the season, please forward this information to junior.rep@sherbrookebasketball.asn.au.  If fees are to be paid by anyone other than the person whose email is registered as the contact point, this information must be provided via email to junior.rep@sherbrookebasketball.asn.au

Fees

Total cost of player registration is $550.00 inclusive of GST. Payment of these fees is broken into two (2) parts as shown below.

  • 1st Payment = $350.00 due by 1st December, 2021
  • 2nd Payment = $200.00 due by 1st February, 2022

There is a 10% discount for the 2nd and subsequent children in the family.  If fees are not paid by 31st March, 2022, players may not be permitted to take the court.

Sherbrooke Basketball

BSB 633000

Account 115288474

If you envisage having difficulty meeting payment on the due dates, please contact the treasurer earlier rather than later to arrange a suitable payment plan. This will avoid any embarrassing conversations further down the track. treasurer@sherbrookebasketball.asn.au  Please Note:  Payments received are allocated toward the cost of the uniform if still outstanding, before they are offset against registration fees.

Uniform

New player uniform pack is $275.00. Sherbrooke SUNS reversible gold and black singlet, gold shorts, warm up top, black training shorts and reversible training top .  A $100 deposit is required at sizing up time. Our exclusive supplier is iAthletic.  The time and place for collection of uniforms will be advised by our uniform co-ordinator. New uniforms will not be issued until they are paid for in full.

For new players to Sherbrooke, loaned player tops will be provided. If a loaned singlet is provided without loaned shorts, plain black basketball shorts must be worn. During grading phases we are permitted to have a mixture of uniform styles within a team provided the colour is correct.

Sherbrooke SUNS Uniform Policy

Training  Official club reversible training singlet and SUNS training shorts.

Friday night games Gold singlet and Gold shorts, warm up top.  If required for warmth, only the club apparel (tracksuit pants, hoodie etc.) is to be worn.

ALWAYS wear the Gold singlet and Gold shorts at all Friday night games unless:

  1. You are playing against: Knox, Wyndham, or Sherbrooke AND
  2. You are the first-named team on the fixture, i.e. the ‘home’ team

If BOTH points 1 and 2 are ‘YES’, then you are to wear the reverse side of your singlet = BLACK SINGLET with the GOLD SHORTS (there is no variation acceptable).  There will be some teams who never wear the reverse side of their singlet and others who may wear it two or three times in the season.  VJBL uniform rules are completely different to other leagues – do not get them confused. Failure to wear the correct colour on game night will incur a fine.

Compression Wear: Compression garments must be black without any visible commercial logos. Compression garments must be fitted to compress. Loose fitting compression wear is not permitted. If compression garments do not fit the VJBL’s criteria, you will be asked to remove them.

Club Merchandise 

Is available through our online shop located on our website www.sherbrookebasketball.asn.au

Game attendance

Teams are expected to play all fixture games. This is not negotiable. If a team is short of players for a game, the Junior Representative Administration Officer must be notified so that a restructure can be organised.

Players are expected to be at games 30 minutes prior to the fixture starting time, or as otherwise directed by the Coach. Players must be in full uniform (singlet, shorts and warm up top) no visible street apparel.  Attendance at games is compulsory even if you are injured or sick – but not if you are contagious. In the case of illness or injury, players are required to obtain a medical certificate, so that any games missed will still count towards a player’s eligibility for finals.  Medical certificates must be received by the Sherbrooke SUNS Junior Representative Administration Officer within 10 days of injury. The medical certificates will then be forwarded to VJBL by the Sherbrooke SUNS delegate. Back dated certificates will not be accepted.

Court Time

Court time is at the discretion of the Coach and is decided by several factors. These include: attendance at training, work ethic, skill level and on-court match ups. It is therefore possible that some players will get little or no court time in some games.

Finding the right time to talk to your child’s Coach can be tricky but never attempt to do this straight after a game. At Sunday training there is generally more time for discussion. If you find this option difficult, ask the Team Manager to try and arrange a meeting time for you to speak with the Coach. Do not discuss your concerns with the team manager, as this is not their responsibility. Coaches volunteer their time and expertise for the benefit of your child. Encourage your child to communicate with the coach directly if they have any queries or concerns about their game. This is often a more productive avenue of communication and can serve to develop a healthy relationship between Coach and Player

If your child has a diagnosed condition which may impact on their ability to participate at the required level it is the parent’s/guardian’s responsibility to advise the coach and the club.

All players must play 40% (eight (8) games) of their fixtured games during the championship phase to qualify for finals. Exemption is only granted based on documented medical reasons previously supplied.

Tournaments:  Sherbrooke has in the past supported the Dandenong/Eltham tournament (January) and the Nunawading Spectres Queen’s Birthday weekend tournament (June). Teams pay the cost of entry for these tournaments themselves. It usually costs approximately $450.00 with no ancillary expenses.

Permission must first be obtained from the Board of Management, in writing, if a coach wishes to attend another tournament. If approval is given, it will be the responsibility of the team for all the associated costs.

All teams are expected to assist with court duties for the Sherbrooke SUNS Senior Representative Big V games between March and August. Advance notice of your team’s specific date for duty will be given to your Team Manager when the Big V fixture is released. Attendance and participation is compulsory for all teams. If a team cannot fulfil their rostered duty it is up to that team to negotiate a swap with another team. Duties include: floor wiping, fetching and carrying as required, packing up of chairs and equipment.

Team Manager

The Team Manager is the link of communication between the Club and parents/players, and the Coach and parents/players. It is the key role in providing team contact information to each member of the team and to the Club, checking fixtures, ascertaining colour clashes, making scoring rosters, issuing information throughout the season from the Club, collecting game day fees and completing scoring information prior to the game.  Team Managers have nothing to do with player selection, court time or game strategies and you must direct any such queries to the Coach. Parents/players may discuss these aspects with the Coach at an appropriate time BUT NOT on game day.

The role of the Team Manager does not have to be a one-person role but can be shared between two or sometimes three people working co-operatively. Good communication, computer and internet proficiency, financial smarts and score bench knowledge are the main components required.  Please note: There is no requirement for the Team Manager to perform first aid, but we would ask that you use common sense if a player is injured or requires help. Each team is provided with a basic first aid kit for players/parents to access through the Team Manager as/if required.  The Club will supply each team with one Team Manager’s bag containing, two (2) basketballs, a blood shirt and a first aid kit.

In case of a colour clash, the Team Manager needs to notify the Coach and players that they are required to wear their black singlet. 

All Team Managers are required to have a current ‘Working with Children Check’ card, provide a Member Protection Declaration and supply a copy of each to the Junior Representative Administration Officer. This information is then forwarded to the VJBL by the Sherbrooke SUNS delegate.

Under no circumstances are Team Managers to contact the VJBL directly. If you have any questions, they must be sent to the Junior Representative Administration Officer for the matter to be followed up with the VJBL.

Scorers

Each team is required to provide two (2) competent scorers each week.  It is expected that each player provides a scorer (parent or other adult) on a rostered basis. This means that if you have two or more children playing; either in different teams or the same team you are given a roster per child (not per family). You may need to advise your Team Manager/s of your multiple duties so there are no clashes. If you don’t know how to score, please let your Team Manager know. There is a manual and video on the VJBL website showing how to score. There is normally at least one competent scorer in each team who can teach others.  Everyone needs to take their turn at scoring as it is unfair on other parents when people refuse to do so. Please be diligent in this role, as this is a part of your child playing basketball. The Guidelines are as follows.

  • The home team (first named team on the fixture) does the timekeeping (buttons).
  • The visiting team (second named team on the fixture) does the computer.
  • If a shot clock is required, then the home team covers this role as well.
  • Ensure you are familiar with the timing rules before the game starts
  • If you put the home team score on the left of the scoreboard and the visiting team score on the right of the scoreboard, then the scoreboard will reflect the computer.
  • Scorers are on the same team as the referees – when in doubt about a call, press the buzzer at a stop in the game, and ask for clarification from the referees.
  • At no stage do you call out, barrack, berate or express an opinion about the game when you are on the score bench – you are in neutral territory.
  • Constantly – that’s CONSTANTLY – communicate with the scorers from the opposition team, verbalise to your colleagues what the referees are calling. At time-outs and quarter breaks, cross check the computer with the scoreboard. If there are errors on the computer, they must be fixed immediately.
  • The computer represents the final result of the game (not the scoreboard).
  • Do not leave the score bench until the referees have confirmed the game on the computer.

Appendix I

Behavioural Technical Foul and Penalties Players, Coaches

Commencing in the Spring Phase, coaches, assistant coaches, bench staff and players who receive behavioural technical fouls in three (3) or more games during the VJBL playing calendar year, will have the following penalty applied.

  • Tech Fouls in Three Games:      Automatic 1 Game Suspension
  • Tech Fouls in Four Games:        Automatic 2 Game Suspension
  • Tech Fouls in Five Games:         Automatic 4 Game Suspension
  • Tech Fouls in Six Games:           Automatic 6 Game Suspension

(Technical fouls for flopping or delay of game, etc. will not be added to your quota)

WARNING PROCEDURES

1st Game Behavioural Technical Foul/s
The VJBL will send an email to the association contact informing them of the relevant person’s first violation.

2nd Game Behavioural Technical Foul/s
The VJBL will send an email to the association contact informing them of the relevant person’s second violation. Relevant persons will have 24 hours (unless granted an extension by the VJBL Administration) to sign and return the email acknowledging that any further behavioural technical fouls will result in an automatic suspension.

3rd and further Games Behavioural Technical Foul/s
The VJBL will notify the association contact that the relevant person has been suspended from the VJBL Competition and will provide the association contact with their return to competition date.

Process for Recording Technical Fouls

The VJBL Administration will supply each venue with a Technical Foul Jot form. Copies of the Jot Form must be kept courtside for Referees to use when no internet is available. Associations are to inform referees that if they give a relevant person any technical fouls, they must fill in the Technical Foul Jot Form online or complete at the end of the game and hand it to the Venue Supervisor, so forms can be submitted to the VJBL at the end of the night with all relevant documentation for the venue. If the relevant paperwork is not received by VJBL from the Association by noon on Monday following the game, Associations will be fined.

An explanation of why the coach/assistant coach/player received a technical foul and how many technical fouls they have been awarded is required on The Technical Foul Jot Form.

If a coach/assistant coach/player is also reported by the referee, then this must be indicated on the Technical Foul Jot Form and the official report form MUST be sent to the VJBL.

Appealing Behavioural Technical Foul or Penalty

Coaches/assistant coaches/players who receive a behavioural technical foul have the right to appeal to the VJBL Administration for a review of their technical foul record by close of business on the next business day. This must be emailed by their association contact or delegate. Response to a review request will be advised within 48 business hours of the request being received.

If a relevant person is suspended, the association contact or delegate may email the VJBL within 24 hours of receiving the penalty notification to appeal the suspension, this must include the $50 application fee. This will then be passed on to the Junior Representative Commission Appeals Committee for review. The Appeals Committee decision is final.

Appendix II

Spectator Behavioural Technical Foul and Penalties

VJBL Spectator Requirements

  • At no point before, during or after a game, are spectators permitted to approach a referee.
  • All spectators must abide by the BV Spectator Code of Conduct.
  • If asked to leave the venue by a venue official, spectator/s must do so immediately, or reports and loss of games may be applied.

Spectator Removal

The following procedure is required to be followed if a Venue Official requires a spectator/s to leave the venue.

  • The Venue Official must complete the Spectator Behaviour ‑ Jot Form online if they believe the spectator/s behaviour was at a level that they were required to leave the venue.
  • If the spectator has been reported to the tribunal by an official, this is to be detailed on the Spectator Behaviour – Jot Form and forwarded to the VJBL Administration.
  • NOTE: Not all ejections require an official tribunal report. This is only done when the action/s of those involved warrant a formal Tribunal Report.
  • If the spectator/s won’t voluntarily give their name, please complete the jot form and the VJBL Administration will follow the name up with the team involved.

Spectator Penalties

The VJBL Administration will review all Spectator Behaviour – Jot Forms.

The following procedures will be followed on the Reportable Offences after reviewing the Spectator Behaviour – Jot Form (and Tribunal Report Forms where completed).

If a formal report is not submitted, a review of the Spectator Behaviour – Jot Form may indicate a formal report is required.

  • Basketball Victoria’s Governance and Operation Manager or the VJBL Operations Manager will ask the Referee and/or Venue Official to complete a formal report.
  • Once the report is received, an offer may be made by the Basketball Victoria Governance and Operations Manager, or the report will be sent directly to the tribunal.
  • Alternatively, the Basketball Victoria’s Governance and Operation Manager may direct the VJBL Administration to apply appropriate penalties as stated below.

Non Reportable Offences

  • The VJBL Administration will issue a warning for the first offence.
  • The VJBL Administration will apply an automatic suspension of one VJBL game for the second offence.
  • The VJBL Administration will apply an automatic suspension of three VJBL games for the third offence.
  • The VJBL Administration may ban the spectator from attending VJBL games for 12 months for any further offences. Once a spectator has served their penalty, they will be required to serve a 12-month good behaviour bond before resetting penalties to zero.

Team Penalties

It is the team’s responsibility to ensure that all spectators abide by the Basketball Victoria Codes of Conduct and By-Laws. Penalties will be applied to the team involved with unacceptable spectator behaviour.

  • First Offence – The team will receive a warning.
  • Second Offence – The team may lose home games.
  • Third Offence –The team may have home games moved to a venue designated by the VJBL Administration.
  • Fourth and Further Offences – The team may be removed from the competition. These Offences may be committed by more than one spectator to count against the team.

Association Penalties

It is the association’s responsibility to manage a team’s behaviour and educate players, coaches, officials and team spectators on their responsibilities and obligations to abide by the Basketball Victoria Codes of Conduct, Conditions of Entry and Basketball Victoria Policies.

The following penalties may also be applied to the association for repeated breaches by a single team during the current VJBL season.

  • First Offence by a team – The Association will receive a warning.
  • Second Offence by the same team – The Association will be placed on a $500 good behaviour bond.
  • Third Offence by the same team –The Association will forfeit their good behaviour bond.
  • Further Offences by the same team – The Association will receive a $1000 fine per offence. Associations have the right to appeal to the JRC Committee on any penalties, as per Rules of Operation, Rule 11.1.

Appendix III

Basketball Victoria and VJBL Codes of Conduct and Policies

Player Code of Conduct

1.      Understanding and playing by the rules is your responsibility. The rules exist for the safety, proper order and enjoyment of all people involved in basketball. The lessons to be learned in this respect in basketball are lessons that can and should be carried over into all aspects of your lives. Do not ignore or deliberately break any rules. Even if you think that a deliberate foul may give your team an advantage, you should not commit the deliberate foul in the interests of fair play. If you do consistently commit deliberate fouls or break the rules you must accept that there will be consequences for you and your team. Do not let yourself or your team down

2.       Respect referees and other officials Referees and officials have a difficult task to perform and you could not play the game without them. They are there to enforce the rules of play but they cannot always be right. Accept bad calls graciously. Abuse of referees is unacceptable behaviour. Players who consistently dispute decisions or do not accept bad decisions are bad sports. If you disagree with a decision, have your coach, captain or manager, approach the referee during a break or after the game, in an appropriate manne

3.       Control your temper Verbal abuse of officials is a serious offence against the rules of basketball. Verbally abusing other players or deliberately distracting or provoking an opponent are also not acceptable or permitted in basketball. Loss of temper is not only unpleasant for other participants in the game, it can also distract you and have an adverse effect on your concentration and effectiveness on the court

4.       Work equally hard for yourself and for your team You owe it to yourself and others involved in your team to train and play to the best of your ability. Your team’s performance will benefit and so will you. If you are half-hearted about your involvement in the sport, you will become dissatisfied and lose out on the enjoyment and satisfaction you can derive from giving it your best.

5.       Be a good sport. Acknowledge all good plays, whether they be by your team or the other team. Good manners and respect can be infectious. Everyone likes to be prased when they do something well. If you acknowledge the achievements of your opponents it is likely they will follow suit. Part of the participation in sport is respect for all participants in the game. Your opponents are entitled to proper courtesy. Always introduce yourself to your opponents on court, congratulate them whether you win or lose and accept a loss gracefully. Remember that the opposition coach is there trying to do the best for their team and is also entitled to respect.

6.       Treat all players as you would like to be treated Do not interfere with, bully or take unfair advantage of another player. If one of your team players cannot perform as well as you do, does not mean that they are not trying. Everyone makes mistakes. Do not abuse or ridicule another player when a mistake is made. When a player does well, constructive guidance and encouragement will assist a player to improve their game.

7.       Play for the ‘enjoyment of it’  Play for the ‘enjoyment of it’ and not just to please parents and coaches. Playing sport, including basketball, should be fun. This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take it seriously, but that at the same time you should enjoy it. If you enjoy an activity you will perform much better and derive far more benefit from it than if it is an unpleasant experience. You may experience pressure from your coach and parents and others to perform outside of your capability or desires. Whilst this can be a positive and their way of showing you support in your activities, you should resist it where it no longer is enjoyable.

8.       Respect the rights, dignity and worth of every person Regardless of their gender, ability, cultural background, religion or other factor irrelevant to the game, all persons connected with basketball are entitled to equal treatment and respect. Avoid any remarks that could be construed as offensive or discriminatory. Sometimes even a joke may give offence. If a person refers to themselves with a particular label, it should not be taken as an invitation for you to do so. Using discretion is imperative and it is better to err on the side of caution.

9.       Be prepared to lose sometimes Most teams have a win or a loss. Be a fair winner and a good loser. Disappointment at losing is natural, but it should not be obvious to the point of being unpleasant for others. Just as unpleasant can be the boastful winner. Recognise that even in defeat, the loser has achieved something, just by playing. Not everything in life can be a winning situation. Losing can be an important learning experience for your wider life goals.

10.      Listen to the advice of your coach Try to apply the advice at practice and in games. Your coach has been appointed to coach your team because they have certain abilities and experience. They have also undergone training to ensure that you get the best coach that you can commensurate with your skill levels. Apart from skills training, your coach can provide you with helpful advice on all aspects of playing basketball. Make the most of the opportunity provided to you to work with your coach and to have a happy and successful experience in basketball.

11.       Always respect the use of facilities and equipment provided Facilities and equipment cost money and they will only function properly if they are kept in good order. Ensure that you do not abuse anything provided for use. Do not engage in dangerous practices such as ‘hanging off hoops’ or ‘slam dunking’. Quite properly, these practices are banned in most venues. Not only can the equipment be damaged, but serious injury can occur.

Parent Code of Conduct

1.      Encourage your children to participate for their own interest and enjoyment, not yours. Support your children in their participation in basketball but do not force them to play if they don’t want to. Sport is played b children for enjoyment and fitness. It is good for their bodies but should also be good for their minds. If they feel too much pressure from you it may make them rebellious or even depressed. It is very tempting for parents who are involved in a sport, or who have children with abilities they wish they had themselves, to try and force the children to participate or to participate at a level to which they do not aspire. Resist the temptation

2.       Encourage children to always play by the rules Responsible parents teach their children to obey the law of the land, and those same parents should encourage their children to play sport by the rules. If your children show no respect for the rules of the game of basketball, they can also come to believe that breaking the law is acceptable too. If you see your children constantly breaching rules, you should be prepared to speak to them at an appropriate time.

3.       Teach ch3.ildren that an honest effort is always as important as a victory. Your children will suffer many disappointments in their lives. You should teach them from an early age that whilst a win in basketball will bring them much pleasure, it is not the most important thing. Participating to the best of their abilities is far more important than winning. You can help them learn this, so that the result of each game is accepted without undue disappointment

4.       Focus on developing skills and playing the game Reduce the emphasis on winning. If children see that effort is rewarded by an increase in skills, they will derive considerable pleasure and see the importance of striving to improve over the necessity to win every game. Primary responsibility for skills training rests with the children and their coaches, but you can assist with their enthusiasm by attending games, encouraging them to practise away from formal training and games, and even joining in with this practice

5.       A child learns best by example Applaud good play by all teams. Acknowledge all good plays whether they be by your children’s team or the other team. Good manners and respect can be infectious. If you acknowledge the achievements of your children’s opponents it is likely your children will follow suit. This can assist to create a positive and supportive climate for all children involved in the game.

6.       Do not criticise your or others’ children in front of others Reserve constructive criticism of your own children for more private moments. Children can be very sensitive and feel strong humiliation if they are criticised in front of their peers. When you do feel the necessity to speak to your child about something that displeases you, make the effort to explain what the problem is and why you are concerned about it. If you can see some way of avoiding the problem in the future, also explain this to the children. Give your children an opportunity to offer you an explanation. You are not communicating with your children effectively if all the communication is one way

7.       Accept decisions of all referees Accept decisions of all referees as being fair and called to the best of their ability. Referees and officials have a difficult task to perform and your children could not play the game without them. They are there to enforce the rules of play but they cannot always be right. Accept bad calls graciously. Abuse of referees is unacceptable behaviour. Players who consistently dispute decisions or do not accept bad decisions are bad sports. If you disagree with a decision, discuss it with your children in a constructive manner.

8.       Set a good example Show a good example by your own conduct, behaviour and appearance. Children often learn by example. You are the prime role models for them. Make your parenting rewarding and beyond criticism by leading by example. Do not criticise opposing team members or supporters by word or gesture. Accept loss graciously and applaud the efforts of all playing the game. Do not be one of the ‘ugly’ parents occasionally seen at sporting events

9.       Support removal of verbal and physical abuse Support all efforts to remove verbal and physical abuse from sporting activities. Parents have considerable influence in how sports are conducted. Often they are called on to perform volunteer work to help organise their and others’ children’s’ activities. Use this rewarding experience, not just to assist in getting the necessary work performed, but also to influence the atmosphere in which your children play the sport. Children not as fortunate as yours whose parents are not willing or able to be involved may need some guidance on what is or isn’t acceptable behaviour.

10.    Respect the rights, dignity and worth of every person Regardless of their gender, ability, cultural background, religion or other factor irrelevant to the game, all persons connected with basketball are entitled to equal treatment and respect. Avoid any remarks that could be construed as offensive or discriminatory. Sometimes even a joke may give offence. Even if a person refers to themselves with a particular label, it should not be taken as an invitation for you to do so. Using discretion is imperative and it is better to err on the side of caution. Your children will most likely follow your lead in matters of discrimination and vilification.

11.       Show appreciation for volunteer coaches, officials and administrators. Volunteers are necessary for the functioning of sporting activities and without them, your child could not participate. Whilst many are parents of people involved in the sport, many are also people dedicated to the sport and its development. Show them the respect and appreciation that they deserve.

12.       Keeping children under control. Basketball encourages you to bring your children to games, however, there can be dangers to them in a basketball stadium. They can also constitute a danger to players. You should ensure that children with you are well behaved and do not wander onto or too near the courts. When a player is concentrating on the game, a child can easily be knocked down or a player can trip over a child and not expecting a small child to be in the way.

13.       Always respect the use of facilities and equipment provided. Facilities and equipment cost money and will only function properly if they are kept in good order. Ensure that you do not abuse anything provided for use. Discourage your children from engaging in dangerous practices such as ‘hanging off hoops’ or ‘slam dunking’. Quite properly, these practices are banned in most venues. Not only can the equipment be damaged, but serious injury can occur.

Spectator Code of Conduct

1.       Remember that most people play sport for enjoyment People are not playing basketball for the entertainment of spectators nor are many of them professionals. You should be watching basketball for your own enjoyment and to show support for those playing. Help the players to enjoy their game. Applaud good performances from each team. Congratulate all players regardless of the outcome.

2.       Accept decisions of all referees Accept decisions of all referees as being fair and called to the best of their ability. Referees and officials have a difficult task to perform and your children could not play the game without them. They are there to enforce the rules of play but they cannot always be right. Accept bad calls graciously. Abuse of referees is unacceptable behaviour. Players who consistently dispute decisions or do not accept bad decisions are bad sports. If you disagree with a decision, discuss it with your children in a constructive manner

3.       Always be positive in your support for players Never ridicule or shout at a player, particularly a young player, for making a mistake during competition. Positive support for players will offer encouragement to them and most likely spur them to better things on the court.

4.       Condemn the use of violence in any form Never encourage players to engage in violence or engage in it yourself. Violence has no place in basketball and strong action should be taken to discourage it

5.       Respect your team’s opponents, officials and spectators Without a team’s opponents, there would be no game. Their supporters are there to enjoy the game as much as you are. Light-hearted banter with an opposing spectator can add a further element of fun to a game. Conversely, nasty or inappropriate behaviour or remarks will seriously detract from it.

6.       Obeying rules and accepting decisions Always encourage players to obey the rules and to accept decisions of officials. Often players can get carried away when spectators become enthusiastic or heated over an issue. This can be a positive, but it can also be negative when it involves such behaviour as disputing decisions. Always encourage players to obey the rules and do not dispute referees’ decisions.

7.       Social behaviour Demonstrate appropriate social behaviour by not using foul language or harassing players, coaches or officials. Anti-social behaviour, such as foul or abusive language, has no place in basketball. If others engage in it, just ignore them – they will soon tire of it if they get no reaction. Alternatively, ask them politely to desist. If it continues and it is serious, bring it to the attention of an official

8.       Respect the rights, dignity and worth of every person Regardless of their gender, ability, cultural background, religion or other factor irrelevant to the game, all persons connected with basketball are entitled to equal treatment and respect. Avoid any remarks that could be construed as offensive or discriminatory. Sometimes even a joke may give offence. Even if a person refers to themselves with a particular label, it should not be taken as an invitation for you to do so. Using discretion is imperative and it is better to err on the side of caution.

9.       Keeping children under control Keep children in your care under control. Basketball encourages you to bring your children to games. However, there can be dangers to them in a basketball stadium. They can also constitute a danger to players. You should ensure that children with you at a basketball game are well behaved and do not wander onto or too near to courts. They can easily be knocked down by a player or a player can trip over a child when concentrating on the play and not expecting a small child to be in the way.

10.       Respect the use of facilities and equipment provided. Facilities and equipment cost money and will only function properly if they are kept in good order. Ensure that you do not abuse anything provided for use. Discourage your children from engaging in dangerous practices such as ‘hanging off hoops’ or ‘slam dunking’. Quite properly, these practices are banned in most venues. Not only can the equipment be damaged, but serious injury can occur

Appendix IV – Basketball Victoria Policy for Photography at Basketball

Associations and leagues should usually allow parents and close relatives to take photographs and video tape games or training provided the parent or relative is known to the association. The Coach or manager of the opposition team should be notified of the intention to photograph or video the game. Coaches who wish to video their own team’s games or training for training purposes should normally be allowed to do so. The opposition should be informed. Parents of the Coach’s own team should be advised by the Coach if it is intended to regularly video games or training and the reason for it.

Referee coaches wishing to video games for training or evaluation purposes should advise the teams of their intentions prior to the game. Some coaches desire to scout teams that they will be playing in the future and a convenient way of doing this is to video the game. If so, then both teams should be advised in advance. However, this should usually be allowed.

Should any person take objection to the photographing or videoing, they should be asked the reason why they object. It should be explained to them that normal policy in these circumstances is that the photography or videoing should be allowed. However, if the person objecting has a legitimate and strong reason why the objection is made, then a bar should be placed on the photography or videoing. E.g. that the child concerned is the subject of contested custody proceedings or has been the subject of violence or threats and publication of a video or photograph may compromise the safety of the child.

FINALLY – under no circumstances is anyone to contact the VJBL office directly.  All enquires must come from the club.

 TEAM WORK MAKES THE DREAM WORK